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to top it will country's long-time dictator hosni mubarak. today mr. morsi's critics clashed with his supporters while police fired tear gas canisters into the crowd. "he's saying that he's our god" said this protester. "he's made a mistake." and this woman said that after marching for freedom the country's ended up with a new dictator. in alexandria, an angry crowd stormed the offices at the muslim brotherhood from which president morsi draws his support. they ransacked the building and then set it on fire. from outside his presidential palace today, mr. morsi addressed the nation. he said the new measures are designed to cut through political gridlock. "it was allah's will that i became the president" he said "and we need to go forward with the new steps, not backwards." but only 52% of egyptians voted for the president. now many of those who didn't worry that mr. morsi wants to stifle democracy and impose his own islamist vision on the country. >> mason: we're joined by holly williams in cairo. holly, given the scale of the protests, is there any sign morsi might change his mind? >
including human rights activists interpret mr. morsi's powers very differently. >> he keeps promising that this is only for the next six or seven months but there are also no guarantees that the new constitution will respect fundamental rights. >> reporter: almost two years after this country's revolution ended decades of dictatorship, egypt's young democracy hangs in the balance. >> pelley: holly williams is just above tahrir square in cairo tonight. holly, you mentioned it's been nearly two years since the revolution. what's happening with the constitution? when is it going to be written? >> well, it's being drafted by a committee. they've been working on it for several months. i spoke to one of the committee members today said they should have a final draft within days and it could be put to a referendum early next year. the problem is there have been constant complaints that too many of the committee members are hard line islamists who want a much bigger role for religion in government and, in fact, this month two dozen more liberal members of the committee quit over that issue. t
times called egypt's new president mohamed morsi to ask what it would take to stop the violence. mr. obama then sent secretary of state clinton to the middle east. the violence in gaza has forced the administration back into the middleman role it seemed to abandon last year when two years of work by middle east special envoy george mitchell came up empty. but now under the threat of war the u.s. sees little choice except to step in. secretary clinton will ask the palestinians to stop the rocket attacks and ask israel to offer more hope of a longer term peace agreement. >> the goal must be a durable outcome that promotes regional stability and advances the security and legitimate aspirations of the israelis and palestinians alike. >> reporter: the crucial player now is president morsi of egypt whose islamist government openly supports hamas because the u.s. and israel see hamas as a terrorist organization, morsi is essentially the go-between. this is new ground for both the president and the secretary of state. regional and popular support for hamas and the palestinians has never bee
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3